Quantum of the Seas

Royal Caribbean International

Ship information

Quantum of the Seas

About Quantum of the Seas

Time has been kind to Quantum of the Seas since it launched in 2014 and spent time mostly in Asia. Its ground-breaking technology is far from outdated. Cruisers are still enthusiastic about soaring 300 feet above sea level in the North Star gondola attached to a mechanical arm. Nobody is tired yet of flying in one of only five skydiving simulators on Royal Caribbean ships. Plus, bumper cars, laser tag, and circus school – just because you can. As for entertainment, the Two70 interactive venue is one of the most technologically advanced spaces of its kind at sea, unique to Quantum and Quantum Ultra class ships.

It’s a ship that feels built for cold-weather cruising in Alaska, with its indoor family pool and adults-only solarium, but it has enough spectacle to satisfy passengers of all ages no matter where it sails.

Quantum of the Seas Deck Plan Wraps Up Indoor Fun

The exterior of Quantum of the Seas gets your attention right from the start. Between the 30-foot magenta polar bear climbing the upper outdoor structure and the intrigue of the North Star pod, passengers are pulled into an exploration of the whimsical right away.

The play starts with the massive indoor SeaPlex, complete with bumper cars casually parked on racks waiting for deployment as if that’s an everyday occurrence on a cruise ship. The relaxation counterpoint to all that playtime is the Zen-like multi-deck Solarium with its stunning forward view of the bow. A short gap of outdoor pool and splash zone connects the upper deck spaces to the Windjammer Café, making it a seamless process to break for food replenishment before returning to your endeavors.   

Quantum’s Royal Esplanade on Decks 4 and 5, though smaller in scale than the promenades on other Royal Caribbean ships, acts as a passageway to everything else you need within the ship, from food to shows. It feels like a slightly curved two-story mall with sleek lines and lighting that just feels good, as if sunshine was flooding in from somewhere.

Deck 3 serves almost as overflow for the public decks above it, catching two of the four main dining rooms, a large Casino Royale, the lower floor of The Music Hall (which is an eclectic surprise in its own right) and the lower floor of the Royal Theatre. It’s the only deck where loud public attractions and staterooms potentially clash, as the remaining stateroom decks are primarily secluded from public spaces, leaving them quiet and peaceful.  

Quantum of the Seas Has Cabin Surprises in Store

On a ship where 75% of the rooms have balconies, one would expect a boring line up of cookie-cutter rooms with nothing distinguishing one from another. But there’s nothing boring about the cabin choices on this ship.

From pioneering virtual balconies in interior rooms to two-story loft suites, every stateroom category has options – whether it’s an intriguing placement within the ship, how one stateroom connects to another, or a shape that doesn’t match the traditional cruise ship cabin footprint.

The best staterooms on Quantum are the ones that position you and your travel party near the things you came for. If it’s ocean scenery, you’re going to be fine almost anywhere. If you came to hang with your people, there are staterooms that connect like jigsaw puzzles, tucked away behind their own vestibule doors – creating your own private enclave. If your kids are spending all their time in Adventure Ocean activities, the best spot for you might be near AO on Decks 11 or 12. And of course, if you cruise to spa, pick any deck, but consider a cabin near the forward elevators which will whisk you to your treatments.

Are there rooms/cabins to avoid on Quantum? Consider most of the obstructed balcony cabins a last choice unless the price is right. Sure, you’ll have a balcony to sit on to enjoy the sea breezes and hear the ocean waves. But unfortunately, your view of the water below will be blocked by lifeboats. 

Balcony cabins and suites on Quantum of the Seas both include some rooms with larger balconies -- much larger balconies. Both categories have accessible rooms. And don’t forget that Quantum of the Seas suites come with Suite Class perks, including dining in Coastal Kitchen, concierge service, and much more.  

Look for "Food Secrets" on Quantum of the Seas

Quantum’s main dining rooms aren’t secret. They come as a four-pack of restaurants on Decks 3 and 4, each with a name denoting its décor, while sharing the same menu. Windjammer Café on Deck 14 stretches for what feels like an acre, featuring food stations near the front and seating along the windows and across the back of the ship, including some almost secret outdoor tables.

Specialty restaurants that incur an extra charge and a la carte food in unusual spots like the bar bites menu in Harp & Horn are not to be missed. On our sailing with a fresh crew, we found the specialty dining food and service was often superior to the included choices.

You might miss some options simply because they feel tucked away in corners. You’ll find yourself surprised at the array of soups and sandwiches (including the line’s famous Kummelweck roast beef sandwiches) available in Café Two70. You may be equally as surprised to discover the takeaway trays of crispy fish (or chicken) and chips from the corner eatery next to the outdoor pool (port side) – still cleverly disguised as an Asian noodle shop.

We’re assuming the signage will eventually be corrected to its new name: Splash Away.

One last hidden food spot to seek: If juicy hot dogs while watching soccer, roller skating, or hoops sounds fun, check the schedule for your favorite spectator activity then go top your dog (yes, they have kraut) and enjoy the fun surrounding SeaPlex Doghouse.

Quantum of the Seas COVID-19 Rules

For the most up-to-date testing, masking, and vaccination requirements aboard Quantum of the Seas, please refer to Royal Caribbean's 

health and safety protocols.

You can also refer to

Cruise Critic's guide to masking requirements 

on the world's major cruise lines.

Cabins

Quantum of the Seas has 43 cabin types available

Inside Cabins

7 Inside types to choose from

Inside Cabins

7 Inside types to choose from

Inside Cabins

7 Inside types to choose from

Inside Cabins

7 Inside types to choose from

Inside Cabins

7 Inside types to choose from

Inside Cabins

7 Inside types to choose from

Inside Cabins

7 Inside types to choose from

Outside Cabins

6 Outside types to choose from

Outside Cabins

6 Outside types to choose from

Outside Cabins

6 Outside types to choose from

Outside Cabins

6 Outside types to choose from

Outside Cabins

6 Outside types to choose from

Outside Cabins

6 Outside types to choose from

Balcony Cabins

14 Balcony types to choose from

Balcony Cabins

14 Balcony types to choose from

Balcony Cabins

14 Balcony types to choose from

Balcony Cabins

14 Balcony types to choose from

Balcony Cabins

14 Balcony types to choose from

Balcony Cabins

14 Balcony types to choose from

Balcony Cabins

14 Balcony types to choose from

Balcony Cabins

14 Balcony types to choose from

Balcony Cabins

14 Balcony types to choose from

Balcony Cabins

14 Balcony types to choose from

Balcony Cabins

14 Balcony types to choose from

Balcony Cabins

14 Balcony types to choose from

Balcony Cabins

14 Balcony types to choose from

Balcony Cabins

14 Balcony types to choose from

Suite Cabins

12 Suite types to choose from

Suite Cabins

12 Suite types to choose from

Suite Cabins

12 Suite types to choose from

Suite Cabins

12 Suite types to choose from

Suite Cabins

12 Suite types to choose from

Suite Cabins

12 Suite types to choose from

Suite Cabins

12 Suite types to choose from

Suite Cabins

12 Suite types to choose from

Suite Cabins

12 Suite types to choose from

Suite Cabins

12 Suite types to choose from

Suite Cabins

12 Suite types to choose from

Suite Cabins

12 Suite types to choose from

Deck Plans

14 deck images available

Activities and Entertainment

Theater and Shows on Quantum of the Seas

Unlike the line's other mega-ships, Quantum of the Seas no longer has a Broadway show in its Royal Theater. Instead, the entertainment is more like you'd find on smaller ships, with shows like "Sequins and Feathers," a retro Las Vegas-style revue that we found fairly appalling in its sexist caricatures. The remaining shows in the theater on our sailing were headliners: one juggler, one comedian doing two shows, and two musical acts.

What the Royal Theatre lacks in entertainment originality was adequately made up for in Two70 (Decks 5, 6 and 7). This space at the back of the ship is the piece de resistance of the much-touted advanced technology that Royal has installed onboard Quantum. Two70 has vast windows at the rear, a bar at one side, a stage area with seating in a wide semicircle and more seating on the upper level. During the day, it's part cafe, part activity space. But at night, it transforms into something more akin to Vegas.

You can't miss the "wows." The first you'll notice is the transformation of the windows at the back into Vistarama; the floor-to-ceiling glass walls transform into a vast ambient surface more than 100 feet wide and 20 feet tall. There, any scene, real or imagined, is projected in ultra-HD. Vistarama's resolution is nearly twice that of any IMAX cinema. When there isn't officially a show going on, the screen serves as a backdrop for the room, showing various animations, such as a Zeppelin balloon, a giant musical fish tank and a large red curtain pulled apart to reveal a stage. It's mind-blowing, but it's just the start.

Six robotic screens or "roboscreens," which are fixed to a gantry above and to the right of the stage, really push the innovation envelope. Each is fixed to a robotic arm that -- according to the tech wizards behind them -- is programmed with as many movements as a human arm, calibrated to within a thousandth of a millimeter so they all can move in sync or independently of one another. While they move, they are screening fantastical images onto their ultra-HD screens or interacting with the dancers.

Daily Things to Do on Quantum of the Seas

Things to do onboard Quantum range from the typical cruise ship lineup of bingo, trivia, dance class to the athletic and adventurous such as the Royal Escape Room and Ripcord by iFly skydiving. A partial rundown of the week’s activities in the SeaPlex includes laser tag, 3-on-3 basketball, table tennis tournaments, pickleball, soccer, and of course, bumper cars. Scavenger hunts originating in The Music Hall are a daily treat and Casino Royale hosts learn-to-play gaming lessons as well as poker, blackjack, and slot tournaments on sea days.

Both the Cruise Compass paper delivered daily to your stateroom and the Royal App have detailed lists of activities scheduled each day. The app will even allow you to schedule activities, then alert you when you have something planned. 

Nightlife on Quantum of the Seas

The nightlife onboard Quantum of the Seas offers those who want to party long into the night every opportunity to do so. From live music and dancing at The Music Hall to karaoke at Boleros, it’s easy to find what suits you.

Casino Royale has a good selection of table games and slot machines, though on our sailing, some of the action was still in the process of being swapped out from Chinese games to English equipment. A casino host is there to answer questions about any of the games, host prize giveaways among slot players, and is particularly helpful about the line’s casino loyalty program. 

Quantum of the Seas Bars and Lounges

Quantum’s bars and lounges come in two basic varieties: those that are tucked into a strategic corner where you might want a drink or a place to sit and chat with a friend, and “destination” spots where you go looking for entertainment or dancing.

Our Picks

In the center of the action: We loved Boleros. It’s the kind of spot where a crowd gathers at the door to catch glimpses of an amazing Karaoke singer, or where you might while away a sea day afternoon taking part in a cocktail tasting. We joined in on a Caribbean Drink tasting (yes, while sailing to Alaska) and had a fabulous learning experience. The bartender even let us shake the cocktail shaker. 

The best place to get brain freeze: The Sunshine Bar inside the Solarium has a blender, and they know how to use it. Ask for a BBC (Bailey’s Banana Colada), then avoid the brain freeze by drinking it in one of the Solarium’s double hot tubs with a perfect forward view as the ship sails to its next port. 

For tech lovers: Bionic Bar on Deck 5 is worth stopping by, even if only for a selfie. Most passengers just call it the "robot bar" because it features two robot bartenders that mix drinks via orders from passengers made on tablets. A digital display shows the wait times for drinks, who has ordered what and which ingredients go in each cocktail. It's a lot of fun to watch, but it's really more of a novelty.

If you wanna pretend you’re in Nashville or Austin: The eclectic décor inside the multi-story venue called The Music Hall transports you to your favorite music city. Add a live band on stage, a few couples on the dance floor and you might forget you’re even on a cruise ship. Oh, and you can shoot a game of pool in the back room -- on pool tables designed to level themselves on rough seas. Yes, really. 

For the breakfast diva: We kind of loved the bar in the corner of Windjammer on the starboard side. It’s a great spot to snag a mimosa or to give your morning coffee a little kick before you join the hoards at the buffet stations.

Pools and Hot Tubs on Quantum of the Seas

There are three main pools, all on Deck 14 -- an outdoor pool, an indoor pool with a retractable roof and a third (tiered) pool in the adults-only Solarium. There are lots of lounge chairs for soaking up the sun, as well as comfy wicker chairs and couches, mostly in the shade. Near the main pool, you can grab a cool treat from two soft serve ice cream machines. Four hot tubs are available.

Toward the aft of the main pool deck area on Deck 14, you'll find the H2O Zone, dedicated to families with young children. It's not entirely separate; it's more an adjunct to the main pools, with a wave pool for youngsters (complete with various Madagascar figures, such as the Penguins and Gloria the hippo). Beside that, there's a little splash pool for babies.

On Quantum, the Solarium space is reserved for guests ages 16 and up. There are three tiers of pools spilling over into the next, with forward-facing ocean views. There are two double hot tubs and an air of serenity. The area has lounge chairs and comfy wicker beds and chairs. On sailings in Alaska, this is one of the most popular spots on the ship while it is underway, making it hard to get a seat. 

North Star and Skydiving on Quantum of the Seas

What Quantum lacks in water slides, it makes up for in innovative features like iFly and North Star. Adrenaline junkies should head straight to the back of Deck 16 for iFly by RipCord, a skydiving simulator. It comes with an extra charge. You’ll need reservations for iFly, as it's incredibly popular. Don't be afraid though; it's really a blast to try out. (Be prepared for a little muscle soreness the next day; you'll find you probably clenched and worked muscles in new ways.) Nearby is the FlowRider surf simulator, as well as a rock-climbing wall.

One of the unique activities to try out is North Star, a jewel-shaped glass globe that rises 300 feet above sea level and provides 360-degree views from high above the ship. Appointments are needed for rides, which are free in port, but come at an extra cost any other time. You can reserve a time slot in person or on the Royal App.

Sundecks on Quantum of the Seas

If you want to grab some rays, head up to Deck 15. There, you'll find loungers surrounding the jogging track but little shade.

An exclusive sun deck for suite passengers is found on Deck 16, just forward of the SeaPlex's upper level.

Services and Wi-Fi on Quantum of the Seas

Guest services is in a small, recessed area across from Boleros on Deck 4. A crew member is always nearby to help passengers with everything from reservations to disembarkation or statement questions. The Royal Esplanade is the place to shop, from high-end boutiques like Michael Kors and Bulgari to duty free liquor, it’s all here.

Wi-Fi through Voom is still among the fastest at sea; we had a strong signal in our cabin and throughout the ship using the premium Surf and Stream package. Package prices depend on how many devices you want to connect and are priced lower pre-cruise than onboard.

Dining

Having been recently re-introduced to North America, Quantum’s 13 restaurants underwent considerable changes that required far more than simple signage and menu changes. Even things like portion sizes and food presentation to suit passenger expectations on the new itineraries had to be adjusted. Little things like whether the pork loin is served sliced with a drizzle of sauce or plated whole with a choice of sauces served tableside were evaluated. That meant food may have missed the mark on the ship’s early sailings on arrival in North America—but it was a near miss, not a whopping failure.

Food on Quantum of the Seas has an interesting split between restaurants with most food included in the fare for everyone (with additional charges for select a la carte selections), restaurants that charge a flat fee for the majority of the menu, but which also have selected menu items with a la carte pricing, rounded out by eateries and bars with entirely a la carte food and beverage pricing. Room service is free for a Continental breakfast; all other orders incur a service charge of $7.95 per order.

Free Restaurants on Quantum of the Seas

The Main Dining Room: Quantum has four main dining rooms, two on Deck 4 and two on Deck 3. They are each styled quite differently, but they serve the same menu. We would have enjoyed swapping between the dining rooms, but the two restaurants on Deck 4 served My Time diners, with one handling passengers with reservations and the other serving walk-up guests. Traditional early and late diners were served primarily in the two restaurants on Deck 3, with overflow on Deck 4. Breakfast was served daily on Deck 4 as was lunch on sea days.

Each day’s menu is available on the TV in your stateroom as well as in the Royal App—usually days in advance which is a nice feature to allow you to plan your evenings. In addition to included fare, there are menu options with an upcharge, including steak and lobster options.

The Windjammer: Windjammer on Quantum is on Deck 14. It’s nicely arranged to handle a crowd, with adequate seating at and near the windows so that almost everyone can enjoy the view. Food stations are well spaced and well-staffed. The only real point of disruption we experienced was the same as it often is on other ships: Passengers waited exceptionally long times for custom eggs and omelets. Drink service was both self-serve and offered by waitstaff. Food choices were adequate during all three meals, including child-friendly options. Tips: There’s a small patio of outdoor seating all the way to the rear if the weather is suitable, and whatever you do, don’t walk past those sticky buns. Splurge a little.

Solarium Bistro: This quiet jewel is tucked away behind the Sunshine Bar in the Solarium. Entrances are on either side. Even though children under age 16 are not allowed in the Solarium, they are not turned away from dinner in the Bistro. Reservations are suggested for dinner and the menu is posted in the app. A light breakfast is served daily, and lunch is served except on full port days. The emphasis is on Mediterranean healthy choices in a blend of table service and buffet. In addition to included fare, there are menu options with an up charge.

SeaPlex Doghouse: Unless your hangout is the SeaPlex, you are likely to overlook this hot dog cart replica takeaway eatery. It’s at the far back corner of the SeaPlex, but worth the walk for an interesting selection of dogs, including a traditional American Kosher dog, a juicy Bratwurst, and even a chicken dog. All your favorite toppings are there along with potato salad and slaw.

Sorrento’s Pizza: For pizza lovers looking to grab a slice or a pie, it’s in the center of the action in the Esplanade. It’s open from lunch until well into the late-night hours for the partiers out roaming the ship.

Café Two70: Billed as a gourmet marketplace, this out-of-the-way eatery has a dedicated following of folks who have been there and eaten that. Number one on the list of favs is the Kummelweck roast beef sandwich. Open for breakfast and lunch only. Tip: Stop by here on hectic port days for a warm breakfast burrito to avoid the crowds at Windjammer.

Splash Away: As we previously indicated, Splash Away’s exterior still sported all the trappings of a noodle bar on our cruise. Alas, no dim sum here. What we found instead was the perfect lunch grab and go, especially for the kids working up an appetite in the nearby pools. They serve fish and chips or chicken tenders and chips in little paper trays. There’s some seating around the entrance if you can corral your gang into joining you there. 

Coastal Kitchen: Situated just outside the starboard entrance to Windjammer, Coastal Kitchen is the private dining room for suite guests. Sea Class cruisers (Junior Suites) are allowed to enjoy dinner if reservations are available. Pinnacle Crown and Anchor members may enjoy all three meals if space is available. Sky and Star Class guests may enjoy breakfast, lunch, and dinner and every effort is made to accommodate them, with or without reservations, though dinner and lunch reservations are recommended. Service is impeccable, and the food is often as good, if not better than even the paid restaurants. 

What Restaurants Cost Extra on Quantum of the Seas

Chef's Table, $$$$: On Quantum of the Seas, Chef’s Table takes place inside Chops Grille on Deck 5. It’s the kind of event dining that could take place almost anywhere, featuring a six-course tasting menu for an intimate gathering of 12-16 diners and complete with wine pairings. By the end of the evening, you’ll have new friends, new food favorites, and probably know a bit more about wine. It’s a memorable 3-hour feast, with a menu that may vary according to the chef’s inspiration.

Chops Grille, $$$$: One might think the menu at Chops (Deck 5 just beyond the Schooner Bar) would be overly heavy on the meat, but we found it a delightful balance of starters, salads, sides, and desserts that managed to enhance the meat entrees. The waitstaff is genuinely interested in ensuring your dining pleasure. The only regrettable thing about Chops is the view of the lifeboats hanging in front of the windows. Open for lunch and dinner.

**Izumi, a la carte: **Though it is awkwardly located, almost forcing people simply passing by on the starboard side of the upper esplanade on a crowded evening to walk between dining tables, Izumi draws a happy crowd. The menu is primarily Americanized Japanese, combining sushi and hot food like tempura shrimp, fried rice, soups, and teriyaki bowls. It is not a flat-fee restaurant. Guests choose from an a la carte menu. Open for lunch and dinner.

Jamie’s Italian $$$: Chef inspired by Jamie Oliver, this is the most visible restaurant on the ship, centrally located on the port side of Deck 5 in the part of the esplanade called The Via. Dark-wood tables and chairs and strings of garlic and cured meats hanging from the ceiling lend the eatery much of its Italian trattoria feel. Jamie's Italian offers a full menu of delicious Italian staples, many with a unique twist, like crab and avocado bruschetta. Of course, you'll also find more traditional items, including penne pomodoro, linguine with prawns and eggplant parmigiana. Don't skip the meat or vegetarian planks (literally, planks of wood with taster items placed on top). All pastas (including a gluten-free option) are made from scratch on the ship. Open for lunch and dinner.

Wonderland, $$$$: For those who seek quirky food, this is your dinner place. Decor is a nod to Alice in Wonderland and her trip down the rabbit hole; it's all a little off kilter but in a pleasing way. Oversized keys hang from the ceiling, chairs are mismatched, and blown-glass lighting is as artistic as it is functional. The menu itself is a nine-course set meal that's heavy on seafood and even heavier on imagination. Food is deconstructed, reconstructed, foamed, and shaped into whimsical forms. Think Crispy Crab Cones and Liquid Lobster. Plan for a meal that will be slow; several hours for dinner is normal. Reservations are needed and slots fill quickly at the beginning of the cruise.

**Room Service, $: **Anything outside of continental breakfast incurs a $7.95 delivery fee, including a full American breakfast. The room service menu is available on the TV in your stateroom and in the Royal App. It includes snack foods like hot dogs, pizza, chicken wings, and quesadilla’s as well as sandwiches, burgers, pasta, and grilled salmon.   

Cruise Critic Restaurant Picks on Quantum of the Seas

Chops Grille gets the nod on Quantum. It’s like dining out at your favorite steakhouse at home, with a waiter who treats you like a regular. Every dish we tried – and we tried a lot – was perfectly cooked and presented. Café Two70 is a clear winner for lunch. And frankly, Coastal Kitchen must be included on our list, even though it isn’t available to everyone on board. The wedge salad in CK was actually better than the one in Chops. 

Dietary Restrictions on Quantum of the Seas

We were asked about dietary restrictions at every sit-down meal, which is a good starting point. When a soy allergy was discussed with one MDR waiter, the head waiter promptly appeared to propose options for us. A proactive approach is always advised if servers seem unsure about ingredients. The more experienced waitstaff in the specialty restaurants handled requests regarding specific ingredients by speaking directly to the kitchen.